Archive for the ‘ Awards ’ Category

A VISIT FROM THE TOOTH FAIRY

The following is an interview with Zoje Stage, author of Baby TeethWhile this was put together prior to StokerCon (a conference run by the Horror Writers Association), I had the opportunity of meeting Zoje at the event. So, without further ado …

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The Interview [ by Michael Bailey ]:

Baby Teeth seemed to have hit the ground running. The cover for the hardback is simple: blank white-ish background, shattered red lollipop, and those two words, which somewhat suggest that yes, this particular book is going to bite. I remember seeing the book for the first time displayed in a local bookstore in Santa Rosa, California, or maybe Petaluma, and it was like one of those presidential portraits that sort of keep staring at you as you pass, not wanting you to pass. The cover as striking as the title. And I remember thinking, Who is Zoje Stage? I didn’t buy the book, then. And I didn’t buy it the next two or three times it wanted me to buy it.

Some backstory: My wife and I have a yearly tradition of getting each other two books for Christmas, ones we’d not typically buy for ourselves; that way, each year, we are each introduced to two new writers minimum. The books I chose for her were, of course, Baby Teeth by Zoje Stage, and Cherry by Nico Walker (which he apparently wrote while in prison … or is still in prison, I don’t know). Both books were debut novels by writers I had never heard of before, and both had dust jackets that were a mix of white and red. They captured my attention in their first few pages (along with the back cover copy). The problem, however (at the time) was that I bought the books for her, as gifts, and the rule we have is that we can’t read them until the other finishes. She’s a slow reader, so this had me a bit worried because the two books (yours in particular) kept haunting, kept calling. Luckily, she breezed through it in a matter of days.

Suddenly I’m reading the book, and doing the same, alternating between chapters from the point of view of little, troubled Hanna, and her mother. Every time I’d finish a chapter, my wife would ask, “Where are you at?” and I’d tell her, and she’d follow it with a smile and say, “Oh, just you wait” and so I’d keep reading. I haven’t read Cherry yet, because she hasn’t yet read it, but I was lucky enough to have read Baby Teeth. It’s a real page-turner. This book is going to do well, I told myself, and This Zoje Stage is going to do well, and before I know it the Bram Stoker Award nominations are announced and Baby Teeth is on the list for Superior Achievement in a First Novel.

By the time this interview goes live, we will have already met in Grand Rapids, Michigan for StokerCon, hosted by the Horror Writers Association, and perhaps by then you will have taken home one of those heavy haunted house statues. But for now, we are complete strangers, and so I have a few questions as if we haven’t yet already met (like some kind of strange time-travel). That said …

The questions:

Michael Bailey: What made you want to write Baby Teeth, and why do you feel it’s connecting with readers?

Zoje Stage: I’ve long been fascinated by “bad seed” stories. I hate to say it, but sometimes children seem like otherworldly creatures to me, and it can be pretty freaky when you get a bad vibe from a kid in real life (which has happened). While “evil children” is a trope I’ve enjoyed especially in films, I hadn’t found a book that really delved as deep as I wanted to go, and you know what they say: write the book you want to read. I was particularly interested in exploring the dichotomies of such a child, as I do believe that a tiny percentage of the population may be truly psychopathic, but more often children—as highly sensitive beings—are influenced by the world around them. And I also wanted to see a realistic possibility for how a family would ultimately deal with a disturbed child, and there are parents who really have to confront this.

Part of why I think the book is connecting with readers is the dual-sympathy and dual-revulsion they experience with both Hanna and Suzette. Society puts an incredible amount of pressure on mothers, and that aspect is something a lot of people can relate to. And simultaneously, it’s very compelling to explore the inner workings of a child—especially one who is smart but off-kilter. Apparently even parents of the most wonderful children have glimpsed bits of Hanna-like behavior in their little progeny, and I think this has only increased the relatability of the story, as it makes people really ponder nature vs. nurture.

MB: This is your debut novel, but have you written others that are not-yet-published? If so, what can you tell us about those other manuscripts, and if not, how were you able to land this one so gracefully with St. Martin’s Press?

ZS: Baby Teeth was the sixth novel I’d written, and the fifth I’d queried. The first four were Young Adult, with the connective element of being fairly dark, but the genres were all over the place (sci-fi, fantasy, contemporary, and something too weird to classify but inspired by Shirley Jackson). Then I made a startling realization that maybe I wasn’t the best person to be writing YA (for a number of reasons). While Baby Teeth is technically the second of the adult novels I’ve written, I recently did a complete overhaul of that first adult novel—and maybe it will become my third published book? I do not, otherwise, plan to revisit my earliest novels, and have written a few new things since Baby Teeth.

MB: A Bram Stoker Award is for horror. Do you consider Baby Teeth horror? How fine is the line between that genre and thriller, which book publishers seem to be using for dark fiction. That said, how fine is the line between horror and any other genre? Alma Katsu’s The Hunger comes to mind, which is historical fiction, yet recently won an award for westerns and is up for a Bram Stoker Award for Superior Achievement in a Novel.

ZS: The first inkling I had that my book might be considered “horror” was in Aug. 2018—one month after publication—when it showed up on a Bustle list called “15 Horror Books to Pick up If You’ve Already Read Everything by Stephen King” (The Hunger was also on that list). Prior to that it had never occurred to me that my name would ever be mentioned in proximity to Stephen King! But more lists came out, and Baby Teeth ended up on Bloody Disgusting’s “10 Best Books of 2018 for the Horror Fan” and finished in the Goodreads Choice Awards for Horror in the #2 slot, right behind Stephen King. Suffice it to say, I’ve been thinking about the “horror” designation a lot over the last year.

I submitted Baby Teeth to my agent as a suspense novel, and so far as I know my publisher marketed it as psychological suspense. But since then I’ve heard it referred to as a thriller, domestic suspense, psychological thriller, and horror. I’ve been told by many, many readers—a large portion of them via social media—that Baby Teeth was the “creepiest” thing they’ve ever read. I’ve had readers report that the book gave them nightmares, or that they couldn’t read it at night, or while their young children were in the house … And that’s when I came to understand that Baby Teeth is a horror novel because it scares readers. It’s that simple. From the publishing world’s perspective each genre may mean a very specific thing, but from a reader’s perspective a “horror” novel is one that scares them—and I really can’t argue with that reasoning.

MB: The bio on your website states that “Zoje Stage is a former filmmaker with a penchant for the dark and suspenseful.” What can you share about your film-making experience, and why the move to fiction writing?

ZS: My storytelling goal with film was actually quite similar to what it is with novels: to create realistic stories with well-developed characters who were in odd situations. Film had been my passion for decades, but ultimately it was not a truly viable way for me to be my “best” creative self. It took me a long time to realize that, as it was a dream I wanted very badly, but I had to concede, as time went on, that I was not making the kind of progress I wanted to make, and my health and finances were becoming bigger and bigger obstacles. It’s also possible that I was intimidated by the prospect of writing novels, and it wasn’t until I was able to see the correlations between directing a film and writing a book that I felt ready give it a try.

As a DIY indie filmmaker (forever dreaming of a budget that never materialized), I basically wore all the hats: writing, directing, producing, shooting, acting, editing, etc. Early in the process, I realized that a novelist also wears many hats. The writer of a novel “directs” the reader’s attention toward what she wants them to see and know. She develops and performs all of the roles. In addition to being the production designer, the novelist stages all the scenes, and sets the mood. Each chapter of a book is like a sequence in a film, written, directed, and edited … But the big game changer? I didn’t need to secure locations or props, or upgrade or rent equipment, or beg friends for help in front of or behind the camera. I didn’t need more money to write a book, and I could realistically aspire—with sufficient practice—to “wear all the hats” with some degree of competence.

I found there were things I could do with novels I couldn’t do with film—like exploring thoughts and language—but my background in film and theatre proved to be extremely transferable. And somehow, in spite of living in a society that prefers “watching” over “reading,” from my perspective there are more opportunities for a book than a film, and room for more kinds of stories. One of the unexpected thrills of being published is the “presence” of my book in the world, and the chance for readers to keep discovering it. The publishing industry may not be perfect, but it’s a world away from the film industry and I’ll never go back.

MB: Do you also write short fiction, or do you tend to stick to longer works (asking for a friend)?

ZS: I have a weird relationship with short fiction (similar to my weird relationship with short films). With both, I’ve had the sense that I need a longer format to produce better work. There was a time when I wrote a ton of speculative short fiction and tried—and failed—to get it published. I haven’t written short fiction in years, although I do have a writing “to do” list that includes a couple short story ideas. Will I ever write them?

MB: To see if we can predict the future, what are your goals for attending StokerCon? Who are you most excited to meet? Do you have any predictions for the other award categories? For the last five years, during the award ceremony, I have circled who I think will win prior to everything starting, and then underline those that actually win; I think last year was my best, something like 90% correct.

ZS: I’ve never been to any sort of writing convention so I’m excited to see what it’s all about and hang out with so many writers. It’s a little funny that I have to travel to Michigan to meet “local” author J.D. Barker—especially since he invited me to participate in a local panel discussion taking place a week after StokerCon—but I’m definitely looking forward to meeting him. As a debut author I still feel very new to publishing (am I even qualified to be on a panel? LOL), so I’m hoping to glean info from more experienced authors. I’m also looking forward to meeting some folks whom I currently only know in an online capacity.

As far as predictions … There are only a few categories I’ll even wade into, as I am way behind on reading all the nominees. Needless to say, the nominees represent a standard of excellence and they are all worthy of winning. But here are a few guesses:

Superior Achievement in a Novel: Paul Tremblay, The Cabin at the End of the World

Superior Achievement in a Fiction Collection: Gabino Iglesias, Coyote Songs

Superior Achievement in a Screenplay: Eric Heisserer, Bird Box

MB: After all the baby teeth have fallen out, what’s next?

ZS: I have multiple things in the works, though the only one with a definite home at the moment is my next novel, Wonderland: On the cusp of winter, a hardcore artsy New York City family moves to a place not quite on the map in the Adirondacks, and begins to experience bizarre and extreme weather. Being so out of their element, they aren’t sure at first if it’s just the influence of global warming, or some sort of haunting, or the decline of their sanity … But the situation becomes life threatening.

I also hope to find good publishing homes for My UnderSlumberBumbleBeast—the children’s book within Baby Teeth—and a short novel I refer to as a Wary Tale, which is a Fairy Tale for adults. And I have two other novels in various stages of completion.

2018 BRAM STOKER AWARDS® FINAL BALLOT

The Horror Writers Association recently announced the final ballot for the 2018 Bram Stoker Awards®. I am happy to report that my novelette Our Children, Our Teachers is nominated for Superior Achievement in Long Fiction. You can read it for free here!

My work has appeared on the preliminary ballot twelve times over recent years, and on the final ballot seven, and it’s always a shock. I took home the statue for The Library of the Dead as editor back in 2015, so my fingers are crossed this year to bring home a statue for my own fiction.

Kudos to everyone who made the cut. 2018 was a spectacular year, book-wise / story-wise. I’ve had a few already ask what stuff of mine has been nominated in the past, so here you go. The complete list of the Horror Writers Association’s final ballot follows.

  • Superior Achievement in Short Fiction, “Fireman / Primal Tongue” (2013)
  • Superior Achievement in an Anthology, Qualia Nous (2014)
  • Superior Achievement in an Anthology, The Library of the Dead (2015)
  • Superior Achievement in an Anthology, Chiral Mad 3 (2016)
  • Superior Achievement in Short Fiction, “Time is a Face on the Water” (2016)
  • Superior Achievement in Short Fiction, “I Will Be the Reflection Until the End” (2017)
  • Superior Achievement in Long Fiction, Our Children, Our Teachers (2018)

 

Superior Achievement in a Novel

The Hunger – Alma Katsu

Glimpse – Jonathan Maberry

Unbury Carol – Josh Malerman

Dracul  – Dacre Stoker and J.D. Barker

The Cabin at the End of the World  – Paul Tremblay

 

Superior Achievement in a First Novel

What Should Be Wild – Julia Fine

I Am the River – T.E. Grau

The Rust Maidens – Gwendolyn Kiste

Baby Teeth – Zoje Stage

The Moore House – Tony Tremblay

 

Superior Achievement in a Young Adult Novel

Dread Nation – Justina Ireland

Sawkill Girls – Claire Legrand 

Broken Lands – Jonathan Maberry

The Night Weaver – Monique Snyman

The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein – Kiersten White

 

Superior Achievement in a Graphic Novel

Abbott – Saladin Ahmed 

Moonshine Vol. 2: Misery Train – Brian Azzarello

Bone Parish – Cullen Bunn

Destroyer – Victor LaValle 

Monstress Volume 3: Haven – Marjorie Liu

 

Superior Achievement in Long Fiction

Our Children, Our Teachers – Michael Bailey

You Are Released – Joe Hill

Dead Lovers on Each Blade, Hung – Usman T. Malik

The Devil’s Throat  – Rena Mason

Bitter Suites – Angela Yuriko Smith

 

Superior Achievement in Short Fiction

“Mutter” – Jess Landry

“Dead End Town” – Lee Murray

“Glove Box” – Annie Neugebauer

“A Winter’s Tale” – John F.D. Taff

“And in Her Eyes the City Drowned” – Kyla Lee Ward

 

Superior Achievement in a Fiction Collection

Spectral Evidence – Gemma Files

That Which Grows Wild  – Eric J. Guignard

Coyote Songs  – Gabino Iglesias

Garden of Eldritch Delights  – Lucy A. Snyder

Dark and Distant Voices: A Story Collection – Tim Waggoner

 

Superior Achievement in a Screenplay

Hereditary – Ari Aster

The Haunting of Hill House: The Bent-Neck Lady, Episode 01:05 – Meredith Averill

Annihilation – Alex Garland

Bird Box – Eric Heisserer 

A Quiet Place – Bryan Woods, Scott Beck and John Krasinski

 

Superior Achievement in an Anthology

A New York State of Fright: Horror Stories from the Empire State – James Chambers, April Grey and Robert Masterson 

The Devil and the Deep: Horror Stories of the Sea – Ellen Datlow

A World of Horror – Eric J. Guignard

Hellhole: An Anthology of Subterranean Terror – Lee Murray

Lost Highways: Dark Fictions from the Road – Alexander D. Ward

 

Superior Achievement in Non-Fiction

Horror Express – John Connolly

The Howling: Studies in the Horror Film  – Lee Gambin

We Don’t Go Back: A Watcher’s Guide to Folk Horror – Howard David Ingham

It’s Alive: Bringing Your Nightmares to Life – Joe Mynhardt and Eugene Johnson

Uncovering Stranger Things: Essays on Eighties Nostalgia, Cynicism and Innocence in the Series – Kevin J. Wetmore Jr.

 

Superior Achievement in a Poetry Collection

Artifacts – Bruce Boston

Bleeding Saffron – David E. Cowen 

Witches – Donna Lynch

War – Marge Simon and Alessandro Manzetti  

The Devil’s Dreamland – Sara Tantlinger  

 

Support Independent Writers / Editors / Publishers

If you feel like making a donation to Written Backwards (even just a dollar), know that your money will be going to a good cause: helping an independent writer, editor, and publisher survive in this cruel world.

$1.00

SCIENCE FICTION EBOOK SALE!

$1.99 sci-fi sale
The following eBooks are on sale in the US and UK from February 1st through the 8th: Qualia Nous (anthology), Adam’s Ladder (anthology), and Other Music (novel by Marc Levinthal). For cheap, snag the following:
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$1.99 in the US, and £1.99 in the UK.

A literary blend of science fiction and horror, Qualia Nous contains short stories, novelettes, and poetry from established authors and newcomers from around the world.

  • “0-1” (Introduction) by Michael Bailey
  • “The Vaporization Enthalpy of a Peculiar Pakistani Family” by Usman T. Malik (winner of the Bram Stoker Award for short fiction)
  • “The Shaking Man” by Gene O’Neill
  • “Dyscrasia” by Ashlee Scheuerman
  • “The Rondelium Girl of Rue Marseilles” by Emily B. Cataneo
  • “The Angel Chaser” by Erik T. Johnson
  • “Psychic Shock” by Ian Shoebridge
  • “Peppermint Tea in Electronic Limbo” by D.J. Cockburn
  • “Second Chance” by John R. Little
  • “The Effigies of Tamber Square” by Jon Michael Kelley
  • “Shades of Naught” by Lori Michelle
  • “The Price of Faces” by James Chambers
  • “Simulacrum” by Jason V Brock
  • “Shutdown” (poem) by Marge Simon
  • “Lead Me to Multiplicity” by Peter Hagelslag
  • “Cataldo’s Copy” by Christian A. Larsen
  • “The Neighborhood Has a Barbecue” by Max Booth III
  • “Tomorrow’s Femme” (poem) by Marge Simon
  • “The Jenny Store” by Richard Thomas
  • “Night Guard” by Erinn L. Kemper
  • “A New Man” by William F. Nolan
  • “Voyeur” by John Everson
  • “Kilroy Wasn’t There” by Pat R. Steiner
  • “In the Nothing-Space, I Am What You Made Me” by Paul Michael Anderson
  • “Dura Mater” by Lucy A. Snyder
  • “Ruminations” by Rena Mason (winner of the Bram Stoker Award for short fiction)
  • “Good and Faithful Servant” by Thomas F. Monteleone
  • “Twelve Kilos” by Patrick Freivald
  • “Breathe You In Me” by Mason Bundschuh
  • “18P37-C, After Andrea Was Arrested” by Elizabeth Massie
  • “No Fixed Address” by Gary A. Braunbeck

Winner of the Benjamin Franklin Award, and nominated for the Bram Stoker Award for Superior Achievement in an Anthology. Due to contractual obligations / limitations, the eBook edition does not contain “The Jaunt” by Stephen King. Also available in trade paperback for $14.95. Fiction / poetry; 448 pages; 9×6 format.

Adam's Ladder - Cover

$1.99 in the US, and £1.99 in the UK.

The future of humankind as an ever-changing organism is a subject of much debate. Where is our evolutionary path leading? Will the next rung take the form of mental transcendence, will it set humankind on a course toward divinity, or will this uncertain path involve a dark and terrible reversion? Co-editors Michael Bailey and Darren Speegle present eighteen tales that explore the course of evolution, written by some of the best literary minds in the fields of science fiction and horror.

  • “Ch-Ch-Changes” by Chaz Brenchley
  • “Filigree, Minotaur, Cyanide, Bloom” by Damien Angelica Walters
  • “How He Helped” by Ramsey Campbell
  • “Spirits” by Gene O’Neill
  • “The Mythic Hero Most Likely to Squeeze a Stone” by B.E. Scully
  • “My Father, Dr. Frankenstein” by John Langan
  • “Undersound” by Mark Morris
  • “A Laughing Matter” by Erinn L. Kemper
  • “The Serile” by Paul Meloy
  • “Eyes of the Beholders” by Lisa Morton
  • “Strings” by Tim Lebbon
  • “Sliced Bread” by Jeffrey Thomas
  • “I Will Be the Making of You” by Rena Mason
  • “Nameless Citizen” by Brian Evenson
  • “Painting the Burning Fence” by Roberta Lannes
  • “Pity This Busy Monster Not” by Scott Edelman
  • “An End to Perpetual Motion” by Mark Samuels
  • “Swift to Chase” by Laird Barron

Finalist for the Foreword Reviews Book of the Year / IndieFAB. Also available in trade paperback for $14.95. Fiction; 304 pages; 9×6 format.

Other Music - Cover (2nd Edition)

eBook on sale for only $1.99 in the US, and £1.99 in the UK.

With the discovery of the Thompson Corridors, the universe has been opened up, connecting humankind with a vast network of sentient species. Xenosociologist Jesse Suzuki, a nanotech-rejuvenated “oldster,” has joined the forced exodus of the newly young, mandated by law to ship out through the Corridors after his 80th birthday. Jesse finds his way to Eastlink, a sprawling human habitat orbiting Shjodathz, home to a race of regenerating beings who maintain direct memory of all their past incarnations. While studying the Shjodathí and their planetary biomachine guardian Kedel, he discovers a strange anomaly within the AI’s mind that leads him on a perilous, mind-blowing adventure.

The debut solo novel by Marc Levinthal is also available in trade paperback for $12.95. Fiction; 182 pages; 9×6 format; cover artwork by George C. Cotronis; introduction by John Skipp; interior artwork by Michael Bailey.

OUR CHILDREN, OUR TEACHERS

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Unfortunately, Our Children, Our Teachers is no longer available to read online. If you read the novelette during the free reading period, please consider leaving a review on either Amazon or Goodreads (or both).

A little backstory ….

Jack Ketchum (Dallas Mayr) took a special interest in this project early on because the concept was perhaps something necessary to bring out into the open, something that might happen one day, which would be unfortunate. We wanted to collaborate on either a novelette- or novella-length work, and this story haunted us most. Unfortunately, he was unable to collaborate because of medical issues before he passed, and asked that I finish this one on my own.

The story made the 2018 Bram Stoker Awards Final Ballot for Superior Achievement in Long Fiction. So kudos to you, Jack (Sheriff Mayr in the story; that’s his voice). This one’s for you, my friend.

If you would rather have a more permanent copy, this novelette is also available as an eBook for $1.95, and in trade paperback for $6.95.

Support Independent Writers / Editors / Publishers

If you feel like making a donation to Written Backwards (even just a dollar), know that your money will be going to a good cause: helping an independent writer, editor, and publisher survive in this cruel world.

$1.00

2018 BRAM STOKER AWARDS® PRELIMINARY BALLOT

The Horror Writers Association recently announced the preliminary ballot for the 2018 Bram Stoker Awards®, the details of which you can find below. While Chiral Mad 4: An Anthology of Collaborations (the final anthology by Written Backwards) did not survive the great culling, there are many great anthologies competing this year for Superior Achievement in an Anthology. But hey, Lucy and I gave it our best, and it’s a great book full of collaborations that hopefully brought the writing community together. Check it out if you haven’t already!

The anthology co-editors made the cut for different categories, however. Garden of Eldritch Delights by Lucy A. Snyder is on the list for Superior Achievement in a Fiction Collection, and my own novelette, Our Children, Our Teachers, for Long Fiction.

Kudos to those on the preliminary ballot, lots of friends in the genre, no doubt, and also kudos to those whose work did not make the cut. There are many works I’d personally add to this list, but lists can only be so long. And 2018 was a great year for horror!

 

Superior Achievement in a Novel

The Shape of Water – Guillermo del Toro and Daniel Kraus

Dark Mary – Paolo Di Orazio

The Hunger – Alma Katsu

The Outsider – Stephen King

Glimpse – Jonathan Maberry

Unbury Carol – Josh Malerman

Naraka – Alessandro Manzetti

Hazards of Time Travel – Joyce Carol Oates

Foe – Iain Reid 

Frankenstein in Baghdad: A Novel  – Ahmed Saadawi

Dracul  – Dacre Stoker and J.D. Barker

The Cabin at the End of the World  – Paul Tremblay

 

Superior Achievement in a First Novel

The Garden of Blue Roses – Michael Barsa

What Should Be Wild – Julia Fine

Breaking the World – Jerry Gordon

I Am the River – T.E. Grau

The Rust Maidens – Gwendolyn Kiste

Fiction – Ryan Lieske

The Honey Farm – Harriet Alida Lye 

The War in the Dark – Nick Setchfield 

The Nightmare Room – Chris Sorensen

Baby Teeth – Zoje Stage

The Moore House – Tony Tremblay

 

Superior Achievement in a Young Adult Novel

Pitch Dark – Courtney Alameda

The Wicked Deep – Shea Ernshaw 

Attack of the 50 Foot Wallflower – Christian McKay Heidicker 

Dread Nation – Justina Ireland

Wormholes: Book One of Axles and Allies – Dani Kane

Sawkill Girls – Claire Legrand 

Broken Lands – Jonathan Maberry

The Night Weaver – Monique Snyman

The Wren Hunt – Mary Watson

The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein – Kiersten White

 

Superior Achievement in a Graphic Novel

Abbott – Saladin Ahmed 

Cursed Comics Cavalcade – Alex Antone and and Dave James Wielgosz

Moonshine Vol. 2: Misery Train – Brian Azzarello

Redlands Volume 1: Sisters by Blood – Jordie Bellaire

Bone Parish – Cullen Bunn

Denver Moon: Metamorphosis – Warren Hammond and Joshua Viola

Destroyer – Victor LaValle 

Gideon Falls Volume 1: The Black Barn – Jeff Lemire

Monstress Volume 3: Haven – Marjorie Liu

Infidel – Pornsak Pichetshote 

 

Superior Achievement in Long Fiction

Our Children, Our Teachers – Michael Bailey

The Barrens – Stephanie Feldman

Shiloh – Philip Fracassi

You Are Released – Joe Hill

Cruce Roosters  – Brent Michael Kelley

Black’s Red Gold – Ed Kurtz

Dead Lovers on Each Blade, Hung – Usman T. Malik

The Devil’s Throat  – Rena Mason

Body of Christ – Mark Matthews

Bitter Suites – Angela Yuriko Smith

Shape Shifting Priestess of the 1,000 Year War  – Todd Sullivan

 

Superior Achievement in Short Fiction

“All Summers End” – Tom Deady

“Life After Breath” – Tori Eldridge

“Cold, Silent, and Dark” – Kary English

“The Gods in Their Seats, Unblinking” – Kurt Fawver

“The Woman in the Blue Dress” – Heather Herrman

“Mutter” – Jess Landry

“Dead End Town” – Lee Murray

“Glove Box” – Annie Neugebauer

“Fish Hooks” – Kit Power

“Her Royal Counsel” – Andrew Robertson

“A Winter’s Tale” – John F.D. Taff

“And in Her Eyes the City Drowned” – Kyla Lee Ward

 

Superior Achievement in a Fiction Collection

Something Borrowed, Something Blood-Soaked  – Christa Carmen

Spectral Evidence – Gemma Files

That Which Grows Wild  – Eric J. Guignard

Coyote Songs  – Gabino Iglesias

Octoberland  – Thana Niveau

Frozen Shadows: And Other Chilling Stories – Gene O’Neill

Apple and Knife – Intan Paramaditha

Occasional Beasts: Tales – John Claude Smith

Garden of Eldritch Delights  – Lucy A. Snyder

Little Black Spots – John F.D. Taff

Dark and Distant Voices: A Story Collection – Tim Waggoner

 

Superior Achievement in a Screenplay

Hereditary – Ari Aster

The Haunting of Hill House: The Bent-Neck Lady, Episode 01:05 – Meredith Averill

The Haunting of Hill House: Screaming Meemies, Episode 01:09 – Meredith Averill

Mandy – Panos Cosmatos and Aaron Stewart-Ahn 

Ghost Stories – Jeremy Dyson and Andy Nyman

Halloween – Jeff Fradley, Danny McBride and David Gordon Green

Annihilation – Alex Garland

Bird Box – Eric Heisserer 

Overlord – Billy Ray and Mark L. Smith

A Quiet Place – Bryan Woods, Scott Beck and John Krasinski

 

Superior Achievement in an Anthology

A New York State of Fright: Horror Stories from the Empire State – James Chambers, April Grey and Robert Masterson 

The Devil and the Deep: Horror Stories of the Sea – Ellen Datlow

Suspended in Dusk II – Simon Dewar

A World of Horror – Eric J. Guignard

Welcome to the Show – Doug Murano and Matt Hayward

Hellhole: An Anthology of Subterranean Terror – Lee Murray

The Fiends in the Furrows: An Anthology of Folk Horror – David T. Neal and Christine M. Scott

Phantoms: Haunting Tales from Masters of the Genre – Marie O’Regan

Lost Highways: Dark Fictions from the Road – Alexander D. Ward

Quoth the Raven – Lyn Worthen

 

Superior Achievement in Non-Fiction

Horror Express – John Connolly

Adapting Frankenstein: The Monster’s Eternal Lives in Popular Culture – Dennis Cutchins and Dennis R. Perry

The Howling: Studies in the Horror Film  – Lee Gambin

Woman at the Devil’s Door: The Untold True Story of the Hampstead Murderess  – Sarah Beth Hopton

We Don’t Go Back: A Watcher’s Guide to Folk Horror – Howard David Ingham

Sleeping with the Lights On: The Unsettling Story of Horror – Darryl Jones

It’s Alive: Bringing Your Nightmares to Life – Joe Mynhardt and Eugene Johnson

A Place of Darkness: The Rhetoric of Horror in Early American Cinema – Kendall R. Phillips

Wasteland: The Great Ward and the Origins of Modern Horror – W. Scott Poole

Uncovering Stranger Things: Essays on Eighties Nostalgia, Cynicism and Innocence in the Series – Kevin J. Wetmore Jr.

 

Superior Achievement in a Poetry Collection

Artifacts – Bruce Boston

The Comfort of Screams – G.O. Clark 

Bleeding Saffron – David E. Cowen 

The Hatch – Joe Fletcher

Witches – Donna Lynch

Thirteen Nocturnes – Oliver Shepard

War – Marge Simon and Alessandro Manzetti  

The Devil’s Dreamland – Sara Tantlinger  

Candle and Pins: Poems on Superstitions – Jacqueline West

Gwendolyn Witch and Other Macabria – Twyla Wren

Support Independent Writers / Editors / Publishers

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WHO’S WHO / THE LIST

Written Backwards has survived over the years publishing a wide array of creativity: short stories, novelettes, novellas, poetry, illustrations and, most recently, graphic adaptations. Most of the work appears in original anthologies, but a few select novels, debut fiction collections, and other strange projects have popped up over the years.

The goal: to seek diverse work, to push literary boundaries, to create the most beautiful books imaginable (and to provide professional-rate payments to contributors when at all possible). The result: a who’s who list of writers and artists. Millions of words. Hundreds of illustrations. Familiarize yourself with these wonderful people.

So, just who has Written Backwards published over the years, and where? Here’s a start, alphabetically by last name. All are short stories (unless specified, like this).

Addison, Linda D.

  • “Things That the Earth No Longer Bears” (poem) and “Life Poems” (a series of haiku) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Alfrey, Aeron

  • Illustrations – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017 (reprints)

Anderson, Paul Michael

Arcuri, Meghan

  • “Inevitable” – Chiral Mad © 2012
  • “Watch Me” – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • “Introduction” (nonfiction) – The Near Future © 2017
  • “What’s in a Mentor” – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Arnzen, Michael

  • “Why the Bram Soker Award Matters” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Bahr, Laura Lee

Bailey, Michael

Baldwin, Ben

  • Illustration – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017 (reprint)

Balog, Jonathan

  • “Fail-Safe” and “Insomnia in Reverse” (poems) – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016

Barron, Laird

  • “Swift to Chase” (novelette) – Adam’s Ladder © 2017
  • “The Loveliest Form of the Dark Side” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Batson, Michael Ian

Bear, Elizabeth

  • The Wreck of the Charles Dexter Ward” (novelette, with Sarah Monette) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018 

Biggs, John

Blackthorn, Rose

  • “Prescience” and “Arbitration” (poems) – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016

Bodner, Hal

  • “A Rift in Reflection” – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016 (Bram Stoker Award nominee)
  • “Keepsakes” – You, Human © 2016

Booth III, Max

  • “Flowers Blooming in the Season of Atrophy” – Chiral Mad 2 © 2013
  • “The Neighborhood Has a Barbeque” – Qualia Nous © 2014
  • “Blood Dust” – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • “The Big Question” (Guest of Honor Interview of Victor LaValle) and “The Importance of First Novels” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Boston, Bruce

  • “Reflecting on Reflections” and “Beyond Symmetry” (poems) – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • “Carnival of Ghosts” (poem, with Marge Simon) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Boyer, Ann K.

  • “In the Eyes of the Beholder” – Chiral Mad 2 © 2013

Braoddus, Maurice

  • “Wolf at the Door” (with Anthony R. Cardno) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Braunbeck, Gary A.

  • “Need” – Chiral Mad © 2005, 2012 (reprint)
  • “The Great Pity” (novelette) – Chiral Mad 2 © 2013 (Bram Stoker Award winner)
  • “No Fixed Address” (novelette) – Qualia Nous © 2014
  • “Tales the Ashes Tell” – The Library of the Dead © 2015
  • “Silver Thread, Hammer Ring” (novelette) – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • “Falling Faces by the Wayside” – You, Human © 2001, 2016 (reprint)
  • “Somewhere Between the Mundane and the Miraculous” (introduction, with Janet Harriett) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Brenchley, Chad

  • “Ch-Ch-Changes” – Adam’s Ladder © 2017
  • “Here Today and Gone Tomorrow” – Prisms © 2019 (PS Publishing)

Brittany, Michele

  • “Furthers Horror Studies Scholarship for Second Year” (essay on the Ann Radcliffe Academic Conference, with Nicholas Diak) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Brock, Jason V

  • “Simulacrum” – Qualia Nous © 2013, 2014 (reprint)
  • “Windows, Mirrors, Doors” – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • “Unity of Affect” – You, Human © 2016
  • “When Horror Gets Real” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Brozek, Jennifer

  • “Home and Hope Both Sound a Little Bit Like ‘Hunger'” (with Seanan McGuire) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Bulkin, Nadia

  • “A Luta Continua” – Prisms © 2019 (PS Publishing)

Bundschuh, Mason Ian

Burke, Chesya

  • “Peregrination” (novelette, with LH Moore) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Burge, Weldon

Burke, Kealan Patrick

Cabeen, Bob

  • Illustrations – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017 (reprints)

Cardno, Anthony R.

  • “Wolf at the Door” (with Maurice Broaddus) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Caruso, Santiago

  • Illustration – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017 (reprint)

Castle, Mort

  • “The Counselor” – Chiral Mad 2 © 2011, 2013 (reprint)
  • “Prayer” – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • “Robot” – You, Human © 2016
  • “Hey, Kids! Comix! You Can Play, Too!” (nonfiction) – Mort Castle

Campbell, Ramsey

  • “The Word” (novelette) – Chiral Mad 2 © 1997, 2013 (reprint)
  • “Know Your Code” – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • “How He Helped” – Adam’s Ladder © 2017
  • “The Way of the Worm” (novel excerpt) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Cantella, Julian

Cataneo, Emily B.

  • “A Guide to Etiquette and Comportment for the Sisters of Henley House” – Chiral Mad 2 © 2013
  • “The Rondelium Girl of Rue Marseilles” – Qualia Nous © 2014
  • “The Black Crow of Boddinstraße” – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • In Her Flightless Wings, a Fire (novella, with Gwendolyn Kiste) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Catronis, George C.

Chadbourne, Glenn

  • Illustrations – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • Illustrations – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017 (reprints)
  • “Firedance” (graphic adaptation, with Jack Ketchum) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Chambers, James

  • “Mnemonicide” – Chiral Mad 2 © 2013
  • “The Price of Faces” – Qualia Nous © 2014
  • “Why Graphic Novels Matter in Horror” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017
  • “The Ghost of the Bayou Piténn” (graphic adaptation, with Jason Whitley & Christopher Mills) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Chapman, Greg

  • Cover artwork – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017
  • Illustrations – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017 (reprints)

Chizmar, Richard

Christian, Autumn

Clark, G.O.

  • “Her Apparition Walked Right Through Him” (poem) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Clasen, Dr. Mathias

  • “The Science of Horror: Why Dark Horror Seduces” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Cockburn, D.J.

  • “Peppermint Tea in Electronic Limbo” – Qualia Nous © 2014

Conquest, Lawrence

DeMeester, Kristi

  • “Golden Sun” (novelette, with Richard Thomas, Damien Angelica Walters & Michael Wehunt) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Derwin, Theresa

  • “Guest of Honor Interview” (of Sam Weller) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Diak, Nicholas

  • “Furthers Horror Studies Scholarship for Second Year” (essay on the Ann Radcliffe Academic Conference, with Michele Brittany) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Di Filippo, Paul

  • “Fifty Super-Sad Mad Dog Sui-Homicidal Self-Sibs, All in a Leaky Tin Can Head” – Prisms © 2019 (PS Publishing)

Dioses, Ashley

  • “The Ocean Queen” (poem, with K.A. Opperman) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Dixon, John

  • “The Fundamental Importance of YA Books” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Edelman, Scott

  • “That Perilous Stuff” (novelette) – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016 (Bram Stoker Award nominee)
  • “100 Things to Do Before You’re Downloaded” (novelette) – You, Human © 2016
  • “Only Humans Can Lie” (novelette) – Liars, Fakers, and the Dead Who Eat Them © 2017
  • “Faking it Until Forever Comes (novelette) – Liars, Fakers, and the Dead Who Eat Them © 2017 (Bram Stoker Award nominee)
  • “Introduction” (nonfiction) – The Far Future © 2017
  • “Pity This Busy Monster Not” (novelette) – Adam’s Ladder © 2017
  • “Words + Pictures = Our First Nightmares” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017
  • “I Shall But Love Thee Better” (novelette) – Prisms © 2019 (PS Publishing)

Ehmann, Jim

Evenson, Brian

  • “Nameless Citizen” – Adam’s Ladder © 2017
  • “The Shimmering Wall” – Prisms © 2019 (PS Publishing)

Everson, John

Fallon, Amber

  • “Guest of Honor Interview” (of Ciatlín R. Kiernan) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Fenn, J. Lincoln

  • “The Secrets of My Prison House” – Prisms © 2019 (PS Publishing)

Freivald, Patrick

French, Aaron J.

Gak

Garrison, A.A.

Gilberts, Steve

  • Illustration – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017 (reprint)

Golden, Christopher

Goldsmith, P. Gardner

Goodfellow, Cody

Gonzalez, J.F.

Guignard, Eric J.

  • “Experiments in an Isolation Tank” – Chiral Mad © 2012
  • “Those Who Watch from on High” – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016

Hagelslag, Peter

  • “Lead Me to Multiplicity” – Qualia Nous © 2014

Harriett, Janet

  • “What Goes Up Must Come Down” – You, Human © 2016
  • “Somewhere Between the Mundane and the Miraculous” (introduction, with Gary A. Braunbeck) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Hayden, S.C.

Hearn, David

  • “Brighter Her Aura Grows” – Chiral Mad © 2012

Hertz, Chris

Hodson, Brad

  • “Opening Script” and “Closing Script” (screenplays) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Hook, Andrew

Jacobs, John Hornor

Jeffery, Dave

  • “Guest of Honor Interview” (of Craig Engler) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Johnson, Eugene

  • “Lifetime Achievement Award Interview” (of Linda D. Addison) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Johnson, Erik T.

  • “The Inconsolable Key Company” – Pellucid Lunacy © 2010
  • “The Apologies” – Chiral Mad © 2012
  • “Welcome Home, All You Uninvited” – Chiral Mad 2 © 2013
  • “The Angel Chaser” – Qualia Nous © 2014
  • “Whisper #1 (a Warning)” and “Whisper #2 (a Prophecy)” (poems) – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • “The Immigrants” – You, Human © 2016
  • Yes Trespassing (fiction collection) © 2017
  • “I Was Not There,” “Circle,” “The Lay of Aldrian,” and “Vespertine” (poems) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017
  • “The Science of Modern Horror Cinema” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017
  • “Ghost Drawl” (with J. Daniel Stone) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Jordan, David

  • “The Truth Box” – Pellucid Lunacy © 2010

Kaplan, Barry Jay

Keene, Brian

Kelley, Jon Michael

  • “The Persistence of Vision” – Chiral Mad © 2012
  • “The Tended Field of Eido Yamata” – Chiral Mad 2 © 2013
  • “The Effigies of Tamber Square” – Qualia Nous © 2014

Kemper, Erinn L.

  • “Versions” – Chiral Mad 2 © 2013
  • “Night Guard” – Qualia Nous © 2014
  • “Phantom on the Ice” – The Library of the Dead © 2015
  • “A Flash of Red” – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • “Gumi-Bear” – You, Human © 2016
  • “A Laughing Matter” – Adam’s Ladder © 2017
  • “The HWA Needs You” – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017
  • The Long and the Short of It (novella, with F. Paul Wilson) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018
  • “There is Nothing Lost” – Prisms © 2019 (PS Publishing)

Ketchum, Jack

  • “Amid the Walking Wounded” – Chiral Mad © 1998, 2012 (reprint)
  • “The Right Thing” – Chiral Mad 2 © 2013
  • “Seconds” – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • “On Readings” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017
  • “Firedance” (graphic adaptation, with Glenn Chadbourne) – Chiral Mad 4 © 1998, 2018 (reprint of text only)

Kiera, Mackenzie

  • “Conjuring the Uncanny” (Guest of Honor Interview of Ramsey Campbell) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Kiernan, Ciatlín R.

  • “Interstate Love Song (Murder Ballad No. 8)” (novelette) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2014, 2017 (reprint)

King, Stephen

  • “The Jaunt” – Qualia Nous © 1981, 2014 (reprint)
  • “The Last Rung of the Ladder” – Chiral Mad 3 © 1978, 2016 (reprint)
  • “I Am the Doorway” – You, Human © 1976, 2016 (reprint)

Kiste, Gwendolyn

  • In Her Flightless Wings, a Fire (novella, with Emily B. Cataneo) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Krisch, Glen

  • “Sudden Sanctuary” (graphic adaptation, with Orion Zangara & Matt Stockwell) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Lacey, Patrick

Langan, John

Lannes, Roberta

  • “A Raven in the Dove’s Nest” – The Library of the Dead © 2015
  • “Painting the Burning Fence” – Adam’s Ladder © 2017
  • “The Girl with Black Fingers” – Prisms © 2019 (PS Publishing)

Larsen, Christian A.

Larson, Amanda

LaValle, Victor

  • “Spectral Evidence” – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

LaValley, Dustin

Lebbon, Tim

Leigh, Sydney

Levinthal, Marc

Lin, Jessica May

  • “Red Runner vs. the Surgeon, Issue 18” – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016

Little, John R.

Lucia, Kevin

Macae, Frisco

Macleod, Bracken

  • “A Sense of Dread” (nonfiction, with Douglas Wynne) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017
  • “Afterword” (nonfiction) – Bones Are Made to Be Broken © 2018
  • How We Broke (novella, with Bracken MacLeod) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

MacLeod, Jay

Malerman, Josh

  • “The Bigger Bedroom” – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • “The Jupiter Drop” (novelette) – You, Human © 2016 (Bram Stoker Award nominee)
  • “The Challenge” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Malik, Usman T.

  • “Blood Women” – Chiral Mad 2 © 2013
  • “The Vaporization Enthalpy of a Peculiar Pakistani Family” – Qualia Nous © 2014 (Bram Stoker Award winner, Nebula Award nominee)

Marcley, Valerie

  • “Detritus Girl” (novelette, with P. Gardner Goldsmith) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Marrs, Chris

Mason, Rena

Massie, Elizabeth

  • “18P37-C, After Andrea Was Arrested” – Qualia Nous © 2014
  • “Black River #1” and “Black River #2” (poems) – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • “Down and Out on Poplar Street” – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017
  • “The House at Wydham Street” (novel excerpt) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017
  • “The Substance of Belief” (with Marge Simon) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

McBride, Michael

McGuire, Seanan

  • “Home and Hope Both Sound a Little Bit Like ‘Hunger'” (with Jennifer Brozek) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

McMahon, Gary

McQuiston, Rick

Meloy, Paul

  • “The Serile” – Adam’s Ladder © 2017
  • “The Gearbox” – Prisms © 2019 (PS Publishing)

Michelle, Lori

Miller, Eric

  • “Yes, Horror Films Are Important” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Mills, Christopher

  • “The Ghost of the Bayou Piténn” (graphic adaptation, with James Chambers & Jason Whitley) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Monette, Sarah

  • The Wreck of the Charles Dexter Ward” (novelette, with Elizabeth Bear) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2012, 2018 (previously audio only)

Monteleone, Thomas F.

  • “Fun with Your New Asymmetric Head” (introduction) – Chiral Mad © 2012
  • “When I Was” – Chiral Mad 2 © 2013
  • “Good and Faithful Servant” – Qualia Nous © 1976, 2014 (reprint)
  • “The Star-Filled Sea is Smooth Tonight” – You, Human © 1977, 2016 (reprint)
  • “Are You Sure You Really Want to Do This?” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Moore, LH

  • “Peregrination” (novelette, with Chesya Burke) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Morrell, David

  • “Orange is for Anguish, Blue for Insanity” (novelette) – Chiral Mad 2 © 1988, 2013 (reprint)

Morris, Mark

Morton, Lisa

  • “Introduction” (nonfiction)- The Burden of Indigo © 2016
  • “Eyes of the Beholders” – Adam’s Ladder © 2017
  • “Afterword” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Muslim, Kristine Ong

Mynhardt, Joe

  • “Illustrations and the Horror Genre” – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Navarro, Yvonne

Nolan, William F.

Ochse, Weston

O’Neill, Gene

  • “The White Quetzal” – Chiral Mad © 1985, 2012 (reprint)
  • “Tight Partners” – Chiral Mad 2 © 2013
  • “The Shaking Man” – Qualia Nous © 2014
  • “Broken Lady” – The Library of the Dead © 2015
  • At the Laxy K (novella, Allevon #1) © 2015
  • “3-Dot People” – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • The Confessions of St. Zach (composite novel, The Cal Wild Chronicles #1) © 2016
  • The Burden of Indigo (composite novel, The Cal Wild Chronicles #2) © 2016
  • The Near Future (composite novel, The Cal Wild Chronicles #3) © 2017
  • The Far Future (composite novel, The Cal Wild Chronicles #4) © 2017
  • “Spirits” – Adam’s Ladder © 2017
  • “Some Thoughts on Short Story Collections” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017
  • “Existentialism, Progressive Jazz, and the Blues” (introduction) – Artifacts © 2018

O’Neill, Patrick

Opperman, K.A.

  • “The Ocean Queen” (poem, with Ashley Dioses) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

O’Rourke, Monica J.

Ottino, Amanda

  • “Enchanted Combustion” – Chiral Mad © 2012

Palahniuk, Chuck

  • “Observations on Horror Burnout” (introduction) – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016

Palisano, John

  • “Gaia Ungaia” – Chiral Mad © 2012
  • “The Geminis” – Chiral Mad 2 © 2013 (Bram Stoker Award nominee)
  • “Welcome to Our Show” (foreword) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Parkes, Ciarán

  • “The Speed of Sound” and “Recognizing Trees” (poems) – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016

Partridge, Norman

  • “Special Collections” (introduction / novelette) – The Library of the Dead © 2015 (Bram Stoker Award nominee)

Payne, R.B.

  • “Cubicle Farm” – Chiral Mad © 2012

Perron, Philip C.

Pillar, Amanda

Piorkowski, Dan

Quigley, Lisa

  • “Emcee Interview” (of Jeff Strand) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Rollo, Gord

  • “Lost in a Field of Paper Flowers” – Chiral Mad © 2005, 2012 (reprint)

Rucker, Lynda

  • “Encore for an Empty Sky” – Prisms © 2019 (PS Publishing)

Samuels, Mark

SanGiovanni, Mary

Scheuerman, Ashlee

Scully, B.E.

  • “Dog at the Look” – You, Human © 2016
  • “The Mythic Hero Most Likely to Squeeze a Stone” – Adam’s Ladder © 2017
  • “We Come in Threes” – Prisms © 2019 (PS Publishing)

Serra, Daniele

Shoebridge, Ian

Simon, Marge

  • “Shutdown” (Rhysling Award winner) and “Tomorrow’s Femme” (poems) – Qualia Nous © 2014
  • “Mirror Image” and “Reflections Through the Raven’s Eye” (poems) – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • “The Fourth Law” – You, Human © 2016
  • “In Accordance with the Laws,” “Less than Human” and “Future Imperfect: Broken Laws” (poems) – You, Human © 2016
  • “Carnival of Ghosts” (poem, with Bruce Boston) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017
  • “The Importance of Poetry in the Genre” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017
  • “The Substance of Belief” (with Elizabeth Massie) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Skipp, John

  • “Empathy” – Chiral Mad 2 © 2011, 2013 (reprint)
  • “Other Music, Indeed!” (introduction) – Other Music © 2016, 2018
  • “Hopium Den” – You, Human © 2016

Smith, Michael Marshall

  • “The Motel Business” – Prisms © 2019 (PS Publishing)

Snyder, Lucy A.

Speegle, Darren

  • “The Cosmic Fair” – You, Human © 2016
  • Co-editor – Adam’s Ladder © 2017
  • Artifacts (novel, Allevon #3) © 2018
  • Co-editor – Prisms © 2019 (PS Publishing)

Spooner, L.A.

  • Illustrations – At the Lazy K © 2015
  • Illustrations – Ensō © 2017
  • Illustrations – You, Human © 2016
  • Illustrations – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017 (reprints)
  • Illustrations – Artifacts © 2018

Spratford, Becky

  • “Librarians’ Day” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Steiner, Pat R.

  • “The Shoe Tree” – Chiral Mad © 2011, 2012 (reprint)
  • “Kilroy Wasn’t There” – Qualia Nous © 2014
  • Illustrations – Qualia Nous Illustrated © 2014  (personal project)
  • Illustrations – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017
  • Illustrations – Bones Are Made to Be Broken © 2018

Stipes, Julie

Stockwell, Matt

  • “Sudden Sanctuary” (graphic adaptation, with Glen Krisch & Orion Zangara) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Stone, J. Daniel

  • “Ghost Drawl” (with Erik T. Johnson) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Storm, Kia

Strand, Jeff

  • “A Flawed Fantasy” – Chiral Mad © 2012
  • “Kind of an Introduction” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Stroup, Chad

  • “Asperitas” (novelette, with Kristopher Triana) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Taborska, Anna

  • “Daylight Robbery” – Prisms © 2019 (PS Publishing)

Taff, John F.D.

Thomas, Jeffrey

Thomas, Richard

  • “Playing with Fire” – Chiral Mad 2 © 2013
  • “The Jenny Store” – Qualia Nous © 2011, 2014 (reprint)
  • “The Offering on the Hill” – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • “Golden Sun” (novelette, with Kristi DeMeester, Damien Angelica Walters & Michael Wehunt) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018
  • “Saudade” – Prisms © 2019 (PS Publishing)

Tlotlo Tsamaase

  • “District to Cervix: The Time Before We Were Born” (novelette) – Prisms © 2019 (PS Publishing)

Triana, Kristopher

  • “Asperitas” (novelette, with Chad Stroup) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Waggoner, Tim

  • “Where No Horror Writer Has Gone Before” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Walters, Damien Angelica

Watson, Ian

  • “The Birth of Venus” – Prisms © 2019 (PS Publishing)

Wehunt, Michael

  • “Golden Sun” (novelette, with Kristi DeMeester, Richard Thomas & Damien Angelica Walters) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Weller, Sam

  • “Böse” – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Wetmore, Jr., Kevin

  • “The Human Emotion within the Frightening Stories” (Guest of Honor Interview of Elizabeth Massie) and “Writing Nonfiction & Fiction for Beginners” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Whitley, Jason

  • “The Ghost of the Bayou Piténn” (graphic adaptation, with James Chambers & Christopher Mills) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Wilk, Dyer

  • “It Can Walk and Talk, and You’ll Never Have to Worry About Housework Again” – You, Human © 2016

Wilson, F. Paul

  • “Introduction” (nonfiction) – You, Human © 2016
  • The Long and the Short of It (novella, with Erinn L. Kemper) – Chiral Mad 4 © 2018

Winter, Douglas E.

Witherspoon, Cynthia

Wynne, Douglas

  • “A Sense of Dread” (nonfiction, with Bracken MacLeod) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Wytovich, Stephanie M.

  • “Welcome Home, Darling” and “Put Me to Dream” (poems) – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • “Final Frame Film Competition” (nonfiction), “The Color White,” “The Girl Who Slept with Monsters” and “Dare I Keep the Body” (poems) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2014, 2017 (reprints)

Yardley, Mercedes M.

  • “The Dead Collection” – Chiral Mad 3 © 2016
  • “Magic in Minutes” (nonfiction) – Stokercon 2018 Anthology © 2017

Zangara, Orion

Zumpe, Lee Clark

Fun fact: Gary A. Braunbeck, P. Gardner Goldsmith, Erik T. Johnson, and Jack Ketchum have appeared in all four volumes of Chiral Mad.

I WILL BE THE REFLECTION UNTIL THE END

The Horror Writers Association recently announced the Preliminary Ballot for the Bram Stoker Awards, and my story “I Will Be the Reflection Until the End” (first published in Tales from the Lake, Vol. 4 by Crystal Lake Publishing) is on the long-list for Superior Achievement in Short Fiction. With permission from the publisher, you can read the story in its entirety here for a limited time. I hope you enjoy! (Updated: 02/09/18)

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“I Will Be the Reflection Until the End”

by Michael Bailey

 

“Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant.” – Robert Louis Stevenson, Admiral Guinea

“Life will find a way.” – Michael Crichton, Jurrasic Park

 

My sister used to collect cherry plum pits in her napkin, secretly, under the kitchen table. A strainer full of mixed yellow and red and deep-purple fruits would separate us each spring, with a small bowl next to it to collect the pits—although mine were typically the only ones in there—and a plate beneath the strainer to collect any drips from the rinsed fruit. My sister was coy like that. Her lie had become our lie, and every once in a while she’d throw a pit in the bowl to make it look like we were being honest. She knew I wouldn’t bring it up to Mom, because that meant I could have more if I kept my mouth shut. It was one of the few secrets we kept from Mom in our youth. Call it a sibling bonding moment.

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